Amor Fati

The Kyoudai Press imprint was originally founded as a collaborative exploration of the reverberations between poetry and photography. With our newly launched Literatura de Cordel / String Literature series, we return to our roots and our mission to create beauty, not to etherize the mind, but rather as the strongest weapon in our battle against apathy, conformity, ignorance, and shallow thinking.

With photography by Alexandra Huddleston and poetry by Robert Huddleston, Amor Fati launches this new chapbook series that is based on Brazil’s popular folk poetry tradition of the literatura de cordel, or string literature. In northeast Brazil, poets and artists sell inexpensive, handmade chapbooks at fairs and markets. The covers are decorated with woodblock prints and the books are displayed suspended from strings. We have changed the form slightly to suit our media and aesthetic, but our literatura de cordel preserves the brevity, liveliness, and accessibility of the tradition.


AmorFatiCover.jpg

 

Status: Published, December 2014

Authors: Alexandra Huddleston and Robert Huddleston

Imprint: Kyoudai Press

Photographs: inner and outer cover

Text: 1 poem

Language: English

Medium: Archival Ink-Jet Printing, Saddle Stitch (stapled)

Size: 5.5” by 8.5” / 8 pages

Edition Size: none

1st Printing: 2014

BUY THE BOOK:

 

US DOMESTIC ORDERS

1 COPY - $9 (includes shipping)

INTERNATIONAL ORDERS

1 COPY - $13 (includes shipping)

Your Paypal payments will be made to Blind Cat Valentine LLC.

Please understand that Blind Cat Valentine is a small business, so we do everything ourselves--including packing and shipping the books.  If we are traveling, the shipment of your order could be delayed (though, we will make every effort to contact you ASAP if this will be the case).

To buy multiple copies of the book, to inquire about wholesale pricing, or if you are a distributor, contact Alexandra Huddleston directly at: blindcatvalentine {at} gmail.com


 

Book flip-through:

Gilgamesh reigned over Uruk,
Built high the city walls and towers.
But he had no friend, no companion,
For none could contend with him.
Then the goddess sent Enkidu, the wild man.
Enkidu, whose body was covered in hair,
Who spoke the language of beasts.
Enkidu came to Gilgamesh and they wrestled
And Gilgamesh proved mightier.
They became friends after that and ventured
Many leagues together. They defeated
Humbaba, giant of the Cedar Forest,
And did other things I have forgotten
Or cannot name.

One day Enkidu died....
— Exerpt from "Amor Fati" by Robert Huddleston
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Outer Covers

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Inner Covers